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TTT#413 Connected Educators and Youth Voices 10.1.14

A special-focus Connected Educator Month webinar will kick off on October 1st as part of the “Student Agency, Voice, and the Maker Movement” theme and set the stage for a month-long set of conversations about creating space, time and opportunities for this kind of connected learning in the classroom. An open online forum for youth and their teachers called Youthvoices.net will also be highlighted as a space that many regulars at TTT work in with youth.

Teachers Teaching Teachers is exactly what it claims to be – an opportunity for educators to touch base as peers and colleagues about connected learning and daily practice. Held every Wednesday evening at 9pm ET, New York City high school teacher Paul Allison invites open dialogue and conversations, “water cooler style,” among a range of teachers and learners from K-University educators, to developers, artists, mentors, coaches, designers, makers, dreamers and students.

This is a perfect time to jump into this collegial and friendly community, as well as get introduced to a related youth/teacher forum called Youthvoices.net, if you haven’t been already. And if you have been, we invite you to reconnect and revisit throughout October. TTT is streamed live via Google Hangout at EdTechTalk.com and includes a chat to increase the numbers who are able to participate.

TTT#407 Welcome Back after Ferguson w/ Marcia Chatelain, Karen Fasimpaur, Alicia Lobaco, Jo Paraiso, and Chris Sloan – 8.20.14

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We were planning a “Welcome Back” episode on Teachers Teaching Teachers, something about how to launch connected learning with Youth Voices in our classrooms and how to be more planful about connecting our curriculum. #connectedlearning.

How do we do that after Michael Brown’s killing and the Ferguson protests? More than ever we need those days, even weeks of trust-building with our students, yet we also can’t pretend that Ferguson isn’t happening.

In addition to this webcast, we offer a small contribution with a #FergusonSyllabus http://bit.ly/1AkhCba or http://youthvoices.net/michaelbrown using Gooru, NowComment, Crocodoc, and Vialogues.

Start with your own questions, then deepen your inquiry into Michael Brown’s shooting, and the protests and confrontations in Ferguson by choosing from these articles, songs, interviews, photographs, blog posts, podcasts, reviews, videos, reports and surveys.

For this episode of TTT, Youth Voices teachers Chris Sloan, Paul Allison, Jo Paraiso, and Alicia Lobaco talk about how we are going to be launch a connected learning curriculum this year on Youth Voices http://youthvoices.net and how we are talking about and learning from Michael Brown’s shooting, the protests, and the confrontatons in Ferguson. In addition we were also joined by Dr. Marcia Chatelain, who has been organizing #FergusonSyllabus on Twitter. On LinkedIn, Marcia writes:

I am first and foremost an educator. I have been teaching high school and college students since 2003. My career goals include publishing on the experiences of women and girls in the United States, African-American women’s leadership and the relationship between food and society.

Dr. Chatelin is also a Ford Foundation Diversity Postdoctoral Fellow and she is the recipient of a 2012-2013 Ford Foundation Diversity Postdoctoral Fellowship to work on her second book on food and civil rights. She is also Assistant Professor in History

#FergusonSyllabus is a great way to connect with others who are thinking about when and how to bring the Michael Brown shooting into the curriculum.

One of the take-aways from this episode of TTT was to be reminded of the power of http://youthvoices.net for our students. It’s important to see and hear the views of students from different communities. The students in Chris Sloan’s classes in Salt Lake City and the students in Jo Paraiso’s classes in Oakland and my students in the Bronx are relatively homogeneous, and they can learn a lot from talking with students outside of their immediate school communities, especially on issues of race.



Go to EdTechTalk to see the chat that was happening during this live webcast,
and to find links to a few of the resources shared during this episode of TTT.

 

TTT#386 Celebrating Open Education Week 2014 w/ Karen Fasimpaur, Verena Roberts, Greg McVerry, Ian O’Bryne, Nate Otto 3.12.14

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On this episode of TTT we celebrate Open Education Week 2014 http://www.openeducationweek.org/ with:

We talk about open learning and open educational resources in K-12 education. We discuss the benefits and challenges of open resources, such as the new K-12 OER Community of Practice, http://www.k12opened.com/community/ and how online spaces like this and others might be used to support educators in opening up their practice.

K-12 Open Educational Resources Community of Practice from Karen Fasimpaur on Vimeo.

 



Go to EdTechTalk to see the chat that was happening during this live webcast,
and to find links to several of the resources shared during this episode of TTT.

TTT#378 A Case for Food Literacy w/ Joseph Franzen, Brent Peters, Lauren Goldberg, Devin Brown, Elfe Dona, Karen Fasimpaur 1.15.14

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Calling all gardeners, foodies, and critical inquirers! On this episode of TTT meet teachers who have been developing amazing projects around food. We are joined by Joseph Franzen and Brent Peters along with one of their students, Devin Brown. In additon Lauren Goldberg, Elfe Dona, and Karen Fasimpaur add to this rich conversation about what happens when we focus on the relationships students have with food.

Here are a couple of teasers:

Before becoming an English teacher and Bread Loaf student, Brent Peters worked as a chef at the Mayan Café in Louisville, Kentucky. Joe Franzen has been an urban gardener, sustainability enthusiast, environmental educator, and kitchen magician for years. He has turned Fern Creek Traditional High School into an “edible campus.”

Read more at “The Case For Food Literacy” on the Bread Loaf Teacher Network Journal http://sites.middlebury.edu/bltnmag/2012/10/25/food-literacy/

See how Joe and Brent helped connect their students from Louisville with youths in the Navajo Nation: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CJoEdHe-p3s

Also take a look at Lauren Goldberg’s article in the English Journal, “Herbivores, Carnivores, and Literavores: Argument and Appetite in the Classroom”http://www.ncte.org/library/NCTEFiles/Resources/Journals/EJ/1026-jul2013/EJ1026Herb.pdf

We’d love to hear how your students have used food, gardening, and critical inquiry in their learning. What a rich place this is for learning — for all of us!



Go to EdTechTalk to see the chat that was happening during this live webcast,
and to find links to a few of the resources shared during this episode of TTT.